Tag Archives: Parmesan

Haddock with a herb and parmesan crust

12 May

This dish is one that satisfies both fussy children and demanding adults, and is a perfect way to engage the children in a little activity on a cold or rainy afternoon.

My inspiration for this recipe comes from Donna Hay, who sets the standard when it comes to the preparation of fresh, flavourful meals that are simple to prepare, and don’t leave you spending hours in the kitchen. And thanks to the fantastic offer at the fish counter at Sainsburys today, which allowed me to buy a very large (over 500g) haddock fillet for £2.58, this is a great choice if you are keeping an eye on the family food budget too.

First of all a few words about the buying of the fish. Sadly I don’t have a local fishmonger, as he has gone out of business. I have, however, been making use of the fish counter in the supermarket which has been the best alternative I can find at the moment.

Take a close look at the choices on offer. Often (as I did today) you can save yourself quite a bit of money just by choosing an alternative cut and asking the ‘fishmonger’ (?) to do the work for you. Today I had the following choice. Skinless haddock loin, boned, £14.99 a kilo. Haddock fillet £4.99 a kilo (it was on special). So, I chose the latter, and asked the friendly assistant to skin and pin-bone it for me, which he did without a second glance. Result, I saved £5 on the total spend, and bought myself strawberries and chocolate for dessert.

INGREDIENTS (SERVES 2 BIG PEOPLE AND 2 LITTLE PEOPLE)

All this fish for only £2.58!

500g approx haddock, or any firm white fish

200g fresh breadcrumbs

70g Parmesan, grated

10g chopped fresh parsley

1 or 2 dessert spoons chopped chives (to taste)

zest of 1 unwaxed lemon

2 dessert spoons plain flour, lightly seasoned with a sprinkle of salt and pepper

1 egg, beaten

1 tbsp sunflower oil

Pre-heat oven to 200 degrees (180 for a fan oven)

Herb and Parmesan breadcrumb mixture

Mix the breadcrumbs, herbs, lemon zest and parmesan together. Set aside half the mixture into a freezer bag and pop it in the freezer for another day.

With the remaining mixture, add the oil and mix so that the breadcrumbs are thoroughly coated.

Set up a conveyor belt type operation with 3 bowls in a row. The first with the

The conveyer belt

seasoned flour, the second with the egg and the last with the breadcrumbs.

Chop the fish into desired sizes. I used the thin end for the children’s chunks and fingers, and left two large fillets for me and Mr Mummyinahurry.

Fish fingers and fillets

Get the children to dip the pieces, first in the flour (dusting off any large clumps), then into the egg, then into the breadcrumb mixture, pushing the mixture gently onto the fillets. Follow the same process for the larger fillets.

Kids at work

Place on a baking tray. and cook for 15 minutes, turning once. (This cooking time holds good for the adult portions, in case you are cooking them separately)

Serve

The finished product

I often cook the childrens serving first, reserving the adult portions for a later evening meal. This a a great dish if your other half is working late, as you can leave theirs in the fridge, uncooked and covered in cling film ready for a late supper.

I tend to serve this with one of my favourtie sides, fresh spinach with garlic. A bit more salt and pepper to season the adult portions, some lemon wedges on the side (from the lemon I zested) and a dollop of good quality mayonnaise. Yum!

Feeding time for mummyinahurry

TIPS

The Breadcrumbs

I make these myself. Shop bought are generally overly dry and extortinately priced They are so quick and easy to make, and you can freeze them in small portions. If you are watching the pennies, then just pick up a fresh baked loaf at the supermarket when its reduced to clear, let it dry out a little for a day or two, then tear into chunks and blitz in the processor or liquidizer until you have breadcrumbs. If you dont have stale bread, cut the bread into thick slices and place in a low oven for about 15 minutes to dry it out.

Fresh spinach with garlic

This is sooo easy and sooo good. Rinse spinach. Heat frying pan and on a low heat soften 1 dessertspoon of chopped garlic (I used the ready chopped frozen variety). This will take a minute or two. Turn up heat, add spinach, and turn regularly for a minute or two, until it is wilted. Strain. Add a little butter, and salt and pepper. Serve.

All in all, the activity time of this with the children was about 10 minutes. It was a bit more mess than if I had done it alone, but they loved it, and they ate all their dinner too. For the adult meal, while the fish is cooking, lay the table, and pour a glass of wine. Relax for 10 minutes. Take fish out and leave to rest for 5 minute. Plates can go in oven to warm while you make the spinach. Thats it. And having made an extra serving of breadcrumbs ready for the freezer, you can make some more soon, in even less time.

Microplane Magic

28 Apr

In case you are wondering how I managed to get the grated parmesan looking quite so professionally fluffy, it is all thanks to my Microplane grater. Almost every guest we have had who has tried this out has asked where we got it and has bought one. Even my mother-in-law who can be very hard to please!!

I first discovered them at a cookery demonstration many years ago. They make any sort of grating almost effortless.

The first one I bought had a rubber handle and a plastic frame. After many washes in the dishwasher, the rubber deteriorated and the plastic casing began to crack (probably something to do with the fact that I think it is not dishwasher proof). So I replaced it with the current all stainless steel version, which is in my opinion, nothing short of fabulous.

I bought mine from a kitchen shop, but they are widely available on the High St, and at the online shopping store of choice for this mummyinahurry, Amazon.

If you want to know the science behind the magic, they explain all here

http://microplaneintl.com/english/mpprocess.htm

My stainless steel microplane grater

Pesto Presto

27 Apr

Hands up those of you that get your pesto out of a jar? For years I used to buy the slightly muddy green coloured stuff that’s sold in the supermarket for less than a cappuccino. It’s quite nice, if you haven’t tasted the real deal. But once I had tried the delicious fresh version sold in deli’s there was no going back. There is only one snag, which now I am not working is quite a big one. It’s very expensive. At the place I used to go to it now costs £4.50 for a tiny container which I think is about 150g worth. Now I may have champagne tastes, but at the moment I am definitely living on a Cava income.

I have to confess that I might be slightly keener on Pesto than most. In fact, when my son David’s gorgeous Australian godmother stayed with us in spring 2007, at the end of the trip she remarked ‘if there is one thing that I’ve learned on this trip, it’s that I didn’t know you could use pesto in so many different ways! Ok ok. At the time I was working. I had 3 different varieties in the fridge and it was a great and quick way to add flavour to a dish. So we had, various types of fish with pesto, chicken with pesto, pasta with pesto, quick home-made bruschetta with pesto…you get the idea.

A few months ago, when I wandered past a couple of large bags of basil going cheap, I decided to take the plunge and make my own. It is amazing. And for the same price as a small pat of the fancy stuff from the deli, I can make a large jar at least 3 times the size. It takes less than 5 minutes. So what are you waiting for?

Don’t be too worried if you don’t have the exact amounts of all the ingredients here. I vary the combinations depending on what I happen to have to hand. Sometimes a few less pine nuts or a bit less cheese. It still works.

Method

Approx 1/2 packet pine nuts (around 50g). I toast them by dry frying them in a pan, but if you don’t have time then miss out this step.

150ml extra virgin olive oil

1 dessertspoon of ready chopped fresh garlic (I buy it frozen)

80g basil (this just happens to be the amount in a packet sold at the supermarket). Wash. Give a quick twist to the bunched stalks and remove the majority of stalks in the middle.

teaspoon natural sea salt flakes

approx 50g hard cheese like parmesan, finely grated. I use a variation of any of the following, parmesan, pecorino,grana padano

Put all ingredients in a food processor and blitz (by pulsing). Be careful not to over process.

Place in sterilized jar and cover with a layer of extra virgin olive oil. This should last for at least a week in the fridge.

Tips

Make sure that the jar you use is clean and sterilized. On one occasion I didn’t bother to sterilize the jar and had mould growing within days. What a waste!

Once you have put it in a jar, cover it with a layer of oil to stop the top of it oxidising and going brown.

If you are not sure how quickly you will use it and worry about it going off, then freeze it in an ice-cube tray. It freezes brilliantly and then you can just get a small amount out at a time.

If I don’t have fresh garlic (or I cannot be bothered to peel and chop it) I reach for the bag of helpfully, peeled and chopped frozen garlic in the freezer (most supermarkets sell this).

Money savers

Basil can be quite expensive, as can pine nuts, so for a bit of a change make a rocket pesto. Replace the basil with rocket leaves (I still add a little basil for flavour), and use walnuts instead of pine nuts.

If you like something a little fiery  instead of basil use sun-dried tomatoes with a sprinkle of chillies (again I buy the frozen jalapenos)

Pesto Ingredients

The finished product. My home-made pesto